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Common Myths about the Modern Day Boob Job

Common Myths about the Modern Day Boob Job

Many women are unhappy with a number of aspects of their appearance, including the size and shape of their breasts. In fact, one of the most common types of plastic surgical procedures is the boob job. Throughout the years, there have been a number of myths about this type of procedure, most of which have been debunked, or at least partially debunked. In recent years, there have been many developments that make this type of surgery less dangerous and more successful.

Here are some of the top myths about boob jobs, and the truth behind those myths.

Myth: If you have breast implants, you can’t have a mammogram later in life.

Truth: This is only partially true. If your silicone or saline implants are above the chest muscle, your physician will not be able to get accurate results from a mammogram. If the implants are located beneath the chest muscles, this is not going to be a problem at all. If you are worried about this, it is important that you discuss it with your surgeon, and ask if your implants can be located below the chest muscles so there will be no issues with mammograms in the future.

Myth: Silicone implants are dangerous and can cause cancer.

Truth: Although at one time silicone implants did have their dangers, technology has improved vastly, lessening the amount of danger involved. Of course, with any surgical procedure, there are going to be some risks involved, but with the right surgeon, your risks when having breast implants should be minimal. Silicone implants were taken off the market in 1992, but were made available once again in 2006 after no studies were able to show a direct link between implants and cancer.

Myth: Implant surgery must be re-done every ten years or so.

Truth: Although breast implants can be subject to a lot of “wear and tear”, there is no evidence that they all of the sudden are no good after ten years or so. They do not have a failure point that can be predicted, and they can last ten years, one year, or even for the rest of your life. It really all depends on many things, including your health, your level of activity and medical factors.

Myth: You can get a boob job done on your lunch break and go right back to work.

Truth: It was reported by a British trade magazine that women can get breast enlargement in just one hour while they are on their lunch breaks. This is supposed by be done by taking belly fat and putting it into the breasts. Unfortunately, this is not true. There is a way that fat cells can be relocated, but this is still in its earliest studies, and at the moment, would take at least two hours to perform. When it comes to a regular boob job, it could be weeks before you are able to resume your normal activities.

Myth: The TUBA incision is the best for breast implant surgery.

Truth: There are four different approaches to breast implant surgery, and one choice is the TUBA (transumbilical breast augmentation) incision. Some surgeons prefer to use the endoscope and enter through the armpit, which is also known as the transaxillary approach. Others use the inframammary approach, which involves an incision under the breast. Others make incisions near the areola. Really, it depends on the surgeon, and which approach he or she does the best work with.

If you have questions about breast implant surgery, it is best to discuss things with your surgeon. He or she can alleviate any fears you may have and help you to understand everything involved in the procedure, including what you need to do after your operation to heal quickly with minimal scarring.


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Quoted rates depend on results of medical evaluation. Actual rates may vary. Certain restrictions and exclusions may apply. Various medical conditions and other factors may require additional costs for surgical procedures and/or make surgery unavailable.

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